Drew Lynch-Dismiss Your Disability and Create a Positive!

Drew LynchDrew Lynch is the young, 20 something comedian who hit it big on the talent show, “America’s Got Talent”, with his incredibly inspiring personal story of how to dismiss your disability and create a positive, and with his truly humorous comedy act. Drew Lynch has a story that could have been tragic, but he found a way and a will to make sure it wasn’t. Instead of focusing on a changed ability, and giving up on his dreams, he used his strong ability to make people laugh and creates a joyous and successful life for himself. That is what it is to dismiss your disability and create a positive.

According to his website, he was hit in the throat by a softball at the age of 20 years old. The damage created by this impact was to his vocal cords and it caused Drew to have a stutter. Where once he was aspiring to be a successful actor, and per his own words, on television, the guy he used to be would not have spent time with the guy he is now, he went through many life changes that only some of us might be able to understand.

Drew Lynch is not alone in his journey. So many people have an ability that has been taken from them, due to medical illness, injury or trauma. If it were more acceptable in society to be unique and different, these injured abilities would not be referred to as a disability with the same connotation that they dream up for us in our current day. Whether it is the inability to hear, or see, or walk, or talk, or to travel, or to go in an airplane, to swim in the ocean, to focus on our work, or any other ability that is not necessarily like others, what we call a disability, is an opportunity to reach bigger and higher and it is individuals like Drew who help to inspire us to do so.

At times, Drew performs with Samuel J. Comroe, a fellow comedian who has had Tourette’s all of his life. Together they make people laugh, they inspire and help to show them a positive slant to all that happens in life.   This is true art and talent and leadership on their parts.

Additionally, it is often said that someone who cannot hear or cannot see, has heightened abilities in other areas. Scientific American published an article on this exact subject. In their report they referred to The Journal of Neuroscience and a study that was done that shows that there is “mounting evidence that people missing one sense don’t just learn to use the others better. The brain adapts to the loss by giving itself a makeover. If one sense is lost, the areas of the brain normally devoted to handling that sensory information do not go unused—They get rewired and put to work processing other senses.”

Perhaps we each have stronger abilities in one area because of a lesser ability in other areas. We do have the choice to use our stronger abilities for the good of many, including ourselves.

Too often, the American public and in fact the public, worldwide, are told that an ability that doesn’t function like others, a disability, is a mental health or behavioral health problem that can only be treated by pharmaceuticals. How untrue this is and in each of our own way, we can take a page from the book of these two young men and many other heroic athletes, performers and individuals who go beyond the expectations of the mental health community and take charge of their lives.

Easier said then done! To dismiss your disability and create a positive! This is the genuine challenge each of us has. Imagine the possibility of first, working with a qualified medical professional to accurately and precisely discover the potential physical cause of your unwanted condition, your disability, and then working with the traditional, non mental health professional, to treat that physical ailment to create a marked improvement in life. Then, to look at your strengths, the abilities you excel at, that bring joy to others, and to use that ability for good. Such as Drew Lynch has done! This is the challenge we all face and with help perhaps the more individuals who choose to do this, the more we can help each other to succeed at it.


Sources: http://preferredparkingcomedytour.com



College Students Mental Health Problems

College Students Mental HealthCollege students mental health problems are the focus of the mental health community and have been for over 7 years. While some may think this is a positive thing, others do not. In the Report to the Mental Health Issues Subcommittee, 2008, college students mental health is the topic and in the wake of the Virginia Tech mass shooting, the State University System of Florida addresses the subcommittee by, of course, asking State Universities to ask for more funding for their mental health programs.

What does that mean for college students mental health problems? It means that each institution in the State University System was advised to come up with policies and procedures for reporting any student who exhibits “at-risk behavior”. College students now, and for many decades, experience a new set of pressures that, at times, brings anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, and more. This is not new and had been addressed, long ago, by the family physician that would perform medical tests to understand why the young man or woman was responding in such a way to stress. There is much medical research in regards to physical ailments and deficiencies and how these things adversely affect the way a person can or cannot handle stress. With the stress and ensuing mental health symptoms, a college student is placed in the position, in our current era, of having mental health counselors right on campus.

While you may feel it is appropriate to relay your symptoms to those counselors, be aware that most campuses are now under the recommendations that were given at this Subcommittee meeting. That does not mean that it is not appropriate to speak with a counselor, it simply means to be aware and that you may want to additionally and/or initially speak with your parents about your troubles. Under the 2008 report this is the recommendation that was issued and followed, “All institutions reported that they initially attempt to assist the student on campus. However, institutions reported that they will either refer a student for an outside evaluation or initiate hospitalization if the student presents an imminent threat to self or others.” This is referred to in the report, as using the Baker Act, the Florida involuntary commitment law.

This is a subject with many parts and at this juncture, let’s examine those parts simply and with factual information.

There have been a number of mass-shootings in public and on college campuses over the last decade.

  1. There is evidence that the majority of those individuals who committed those mass shootings were on mental health drugs at some point in their lives.
  2. The FDA clinical trials reveal that mental health drugs do carry adverse effects of mania, delusions, hallucinations, psychosis, violence, aggression, homicidal ideation and more.
  3. There are medical professionals throughout the state and the country who specialize in the field of mental health and utilize medical testing to evidence the potential physical cause for unwanted mental health symptoms. (I.e. nutritional deficiencies, allergies, hormone problems, thyroid problems, tumors and more)

College students are asked, throughout their education, to analyze and evaluate facts, theories and hypotheses. This is possibly one of the most important sets of data that a college student could evaluate. Our culture is ridden with direct-to-consumer advertising that encourages the use of mental health drugs. Pharma vested dollars are spent in the billions to ensure that names of drugs and promotional campaigns are in the face of every American. Media perpetuates fear and often false information in terms of this issue. They help to drive the one thought process that the individuals who perpetuated these horrendous mass-killings, were in need of more mental health drugs or different ones.

Ask yourself this question: Is anyone deficient in drugs that are in the same class as cocaine? The medical answer, of course, is “No”. No one is deficient in these drugs. They are chemical restraints that when the adverse effects start to take place, create more mental health symptoms for the individual. The adverse effects begin at different times and in different ways for each person taking them. Similar to any other drug, the body needs to metabolize the drug, otherwise toxicity occurs.

Returning to the recommendation given to the Subcommittee, be aware that if the school does initiate the Baker Act on you or on one of your friends, this may halt your ability to complete your college education. Another recommendation in this report is “mandating a one-time assessment for a student who has been involuntarily committed under the Baker Act, to be done prior to allowing the student to return to class.” Again, this report is making recommendations for all State Universities to adopt policy in relationship to this. Perhaps it may be beneficial for you to ask to get a copy of your college’s policy. In relation to a mandatory assessment, this assessment is by a mental health professional and is done based upon a list of symptoms, only, and does not rely on medical science. Mental health professionals have no trouble admitting that fact and in fact, the Diagnostical Manual used for billing purposes has been cited as having a majority of its contributors with financial ties to pharmaceutical companies.

Some college students experiment with the mental health drugs and use them to stay awake and study or to calm themselves down or a variety of uses. What is at stake here is a college student’s entire future. With a record as having been diagnosed with mental illness; or a history of mental health problems; or a Baker Act, will most definitely carry forward in the future of that individual’s career and personal life. The records are private medical records, but the history carries forward and if you are ever asked if you have been diagnosed or committed, at say the Department of Motor Vehicles or elsewhere, you would have to answer affirmatively. For anyone that is held past the 72 hour hold, on a Baker Act, if a petition to keep the individual in the facility, reaches the court, there will be a court record of this forever more and is available as a public record. Every medical practitioner who accesses your records will take into consideration all the stigma and rhetoric that is attached to the mental health history, as well.

People of all ages, throughout Florida, face this situation every single day. Unfortunately, it is often after the fact. Again, think through the facts and perhaps you want to get more information as to the medical testing that can be done to assist an individual in finding out the true cause of any unwanted mental health symptom.

Never fear, the media will have you think you are mentally ill or at least at risk of being so. In a 2015 updated report regarding State Universities,”Campus Safety and Security: Critical Issues”, there shows an increase of 16% in the amount of college students who are experiencing severe psychological problems since the year 2000 and a consistent and steady “increase in the number of students arriving on campus that are already on psychiatric medication.”

All the “buzz words” are cited as being surveyed with college students these days (the same words that are issued in the media on a continual basis); “overwhelming anxiety”, “difficulty functioning”, “depression”, and more. With a 48% increase in college students going to college campus mental health centers since 2008-2009, you know that the media, advertising and rhetoric is winning the race to get young people diagnosed and on costly mental health drugs. College student mental health problems are big money for some and costly in terms of dollars and futures, for others.

Your right, foremost, is to always be given the full factual information in regards to the risks of any proposed treatment and the alternative treatment. Your right is to know that alternative treatment does exist and that medical testing is available to help identify any genuine and physical cause, ailment, disease, deficiency, that may be causing you to experience anxiety, depression, lack of focus, etcetera.


Source: http://flbog.edu/documents_meetings/0193_0888_6676_5.7.2%20ASA%2007b_Campus%20Security_InfoBRIEF.pdf

ADHD Symptoms

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERAFor those parents who have been told their child has ADHD symptoms and needs to take medication (i.e. Mental health drugs), there is hope. A new book, written by the mother of a six year-old boy who was diagnosed with ADHD, documents the success of treating those symptoms through nutrition. ADHD symptoms can be daunting for parents, teachers and children, such as the ones described in the East Hampton Star article on this new book.  The Star reports that the child’s symptoms included troubling behavior, violent, lack of focus on schoolwork and other areas, difficulty playing quietly and fidgety.

This six year old had even been sent to the principal for kicking a teacher. At home, it was no better as one incident was described when “her son repeatedly smashed his baseball bat into his bedroom door.” These types of violent situations are not unfamiliar to parents in this day in age. Unfortunate as it may be to hear, parents across the country are experiencing this kind of trauma and they often feel that the only resort is to listen to the medical authorities and Pharma who tell them their child needs to be given mental health drugs. Those drugs carry adverse effects, documented by FDA clinical trials that include sudden cardiac arrest, suicidal thoughts, homicidal actions, diabetes, hallucinations and more.

Soozy Miller, author of “ADHD to Honor Roll”, offers her real-life experience with the difficult choice of what can be done to help a child with ADHD symptoms that doesn’t put him at risk for the adverse effects of the drugs. First, she needed to find the correct kind of medical help. Meaning, a doctor who was willing to look for a medical cause for her son’s behavior. The doctor she worked with is a functional medicine doctor who approached the situation as a true doctor, in terms of medical testing and evidence of physical weaknesses. In the case of Mrs. Miller’s child, he was becoming toxic from sugar.

Dr. Doris Rapp broke ground on this area in the 1960s as she evidenced the dramatic change in child behavior when nutritional deficiencies, intolerances and allergies were evidenced by medical test and remedied through dietary and environmental changes. For any parent who is interested in witnessing the severe change in behavior that can be caused by nutrition and environment, go to YouTube and search for “Dr. Doris Rapp, Phil Donahue show” and watch this video interview with the children, right there, on film, exhibiting the violent, manic and troubling behavior when either given the food that makes them toxic or exposed to environmental factors that affect them adversely. There is proof-positive, with medical testing and the simplicity of helping the child change his eating habits, that there is help that can last a lifetime and bring a lot of positive future for the child; whereas, the use of the mental health meds can prevent the child from having a future.

Loving parents have the right to this information and Mrs. Miller’s new book offers parents a way to benefit from another family’s struggle to help their child and a chance to share in this family’s success in having helped their son change his behavior and to do better in school. Her son is now able to do his homework on his own and he even made honor roll at school.

For some parents, it may seem as though your child’s doctor would have already discussed this type of alternative treatment with you, but according to a U.S. News & World Report, that is not necessarily the case. In a recent article, David Magnus, director of the Stanford Center of Biomedical Ethics in Stanford, California, is quoted as saying “Risks are not being adequately discussed by physicians with their patients”.

The article continues by letting us know that even research shows that doctors are not talking enough to patients about the risks and potential harms of treatment, to their patients. Financial pressures on the doctors is mentioned as a possible reason for why doctors are “glossing risk” factors of medical treatment when they discuss the treatment with their patients. Dr. David Newman, an emergency room doctor and director of clinical research at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, New York, says, “There’s good data to tell us that when patients are engaged in their decisions about their medical care and informed appropriately about harms, benefits and alternatives, they chose less care, not more — and they usually chose it in a way that actually improves their outcome,”

What Dr. Newman is talking about is covered under the legal concept of Informed Consent. Every individual, worldwide, has the right to know the risks and alternatives to any proposed treatment. That right is assured to you by law and with the love that you have for your child and for your family, you deserve full information, prior to any decision-making.



East Hampton Star, “Mother’s Book Offers Hope for Managing ADHD”,   http://easthamptonstar.com/Education/2015507/Mothers-Book-Offers-Hope-Managing-ADHD

U.S. News & World Report, “Talking to the Doctor About Treatment Harms”, http://news.yahoo.com/talking-doctor-treatment-harms-143750319.html